Alcúdia: the belle of the north

Do you have an urge to check out the upper northern area? Then Alcúdia is just what you’re looking for. Protected by formidable, mediaeval city walls, this spot has retained plenty of its authentic Majorcan charm. In fact it has an almost dreamy quality.

Coffee and a leisurely stroll around town

The town centre is closed to cars. This means you can wander at leisure through the narrow lanes and their small shops. Why not take a peek into the Son Fé Gourmet delicatessen, where you’ll find a selection of Majorcan olive oils, liqueurs and aromatic herbs and spices.

On the other hand, the Torrons Vicens shop a couple of doors down is a paradise for all those who love sweet things – treats abound, including numerous varieties of “turrón” (a luscious Spanish specialty) and various types of fine chocolate. Other shop windows will entice you with brightly-coloured clothing, jewellery, shoes and of course the famed Majorcan basket bags made from palm leaves. To keep you going in the meantime, the restaurants and bars invite you to relax and have lunch, coffee prepared the Spanish way or a glass of Majorcan wine.

The multicoloured bustle of the market

The town has weekly markets on Tuesdays and Sundays, starting at 8 o’clock in the morning. Stalls line up next to each other with their displays of flowers, fruit, vegetables, cheese, fish, bread, meat and sausage, among which you will find “sobrassada” – a typical product of the Balearic Islands…a delicious, paprika-seasoned, cured sausage that can be spread like pâté.

A sandy beach – kilometres of fine, white sand

Just one and a half kilometres away lies Port d’Alcúdia, which captures the hearts of holidaymakers. It’s not difficult to see why, with the pretty harbour area, which offers plenty of hotels and holiday properties – and of course the extremely inviting 3.4-kilometre-long beach, the “Playa de Alcúdia”. Just perfect for plunging into the turquoise blue sea in summer and then basking on the fine, white sand, enjoying the feeling of sunshine on your skin. And anyone who prefers a shady spot can find one under the massive pine trees. The bay is ideal for children, with the sea being very shallow at the water’s edge and only gradually getting deeper. And if your kids prefer wave pools and water slides with names like “Kamikaze”, they’ll be delighted with the nearby water park – the “Hidropark”.

Welcome on board!

It goes without saying that nothing is left to be desired when it comes to water sports in Port d’Alcúdia. Do you feel like a little trip on a motor boat or sailing boat? Welcome on board! Do you like the idea of submerging and exploring the underwater world? You can do that too. Would you like to set out on a voyage of discovery in a kayak or on a stand-up paddleboard? Off you go! What’s more, the region surrounding Alcúdia is also perfect for extended bicycle rides – whether you prefer a leisurely pace or you have a passion for cycle racing. Golfers get their money’s worth too. If you feel like playing, you can be at the Alcanada Golf Club in no time. This 18-hole course on the bay of Alcúdia is one of the most beautiful in Majorca. The sea view is included!

Cuisine, art and culture

Port d’Alcúdia also offers you special culinary treats. This is where Maca de Castro, Majorca’s only Michelin-starred female chef, prepares her specialities! How would you describe her cuisine? Majorcan, avant-garde – and mind-blowingly delicious.

From Alcúdia, it’s well worth a trip to the Sa Bassa Blanca Museum, which is very close by. Besides modern works, the “Yannick y Ben Jakober” foundation exhibits an extraordinary collection of children’s portraits from the 16th to the 19th centuries. They are displayed inside an enormous former water reservoir that belonged to the country estates in the past. If you’re here in May, a detour into the rose garden of the Moorish-looking estate is a must. Abundant flowering is guaranteed as more than 100 old English rose varieties will be opening up their buds.

A journey in time with the amphitheatre

You haven’t entirely got to know Alcúdia until you’ve followed in the footsteps of the ancient Romans. The island of Majorca was once part of their empire, being ultimately situated on some important trading routes. So the Romans founded the ancient city of Pollentia (the “powerful”) in the north-east more than 2,000 years ago and this was the capital of the province of Balearica. Just around 500 metres from the centre of Alcúdia, anyone who is interested can get a close look at what remains of the once impressive settlement. An amphitheatre, temple fragments, pillars of private villas – Pollentia is Majorca’s most significant Roman excavation site. It takes the visitor on an exciting journey back into the past of this beautiful location. And one day, maybe you too can do as the Romans did… and have your own property in Alcúdia, on the island of Majorca.