Sa Ràpita: southern beauty

Sa Ràpita – a double dose of beach feeling on the most beautiful beaches in Majorca. The beach s’Arenal de Sa Ràpita is on the doorstep. And right next door is the dream beach of Es Trenc. This is what you call living or holidaying in paradise. Pure enjoyment of these natural beaches is the name of the game here, so Sa Ràpita doesn’t offer a big water sports scene. The playas here are child-friendly – with shallow water at the shore and all the space in the world for playing and cavorting around.

Cinematic location!

It’s amazing that Sa Ràpita has so few inhabitants – only 870 people according to the latest census from the Statistics Institute. Ok, the little place in the municipality of Campos is a bit isolated with not particularly great transport links to the rest of the island. But it scores highly with its charming location – and that’s precisely why it’s of interest to property seekers.

Seafood on the seafront

For major shopping, you could drive to Campos twelve kilometres away, or indeed the 40 kilometres or so to the vibrant capital, Palma de Mallorca. But even in Sa Ràpita itself, you’ll find everything you need for daily life. This includes a very well-known fish and seafood restaurant on the seafront – the resilient Ca’n Pep. Because of the vast selection on the menu and the amazing view of the deep blue sea and the island of Cabrera, many customers have been making the trip here to “Pepe’s house” for years. It’s the place to come whenever you have a hankering for sole or John Dory, say…or grouper, scorpionfish, lobster, king prawns, rock lobster, oysters, cockles or clams – along with a well-chilled verdejo wine…

Marina with a fortified tower

By the harbour of Sa Ràpita, the fortified watchtower Torre de Son Durí has stood its ground for more than 400 years. Built in 1595 to defend against raids by pirates, it was part of a whole network of watchtowers along the Majorcan coast. Watchkeepers used smoke during the day and fire by night to signal if there was a threat approaching from the sea.

Cast off for Cabrera

At the marina, Club Nàutic has space for about 475 motorboats and sailing yachts. Mooring your boat here means you’ll be in pole position… not only to explore the south coast of Majorca, but also to cast off for Cabrera. The Cabrera Archipelago is one of the largest land and marine national parks in the western Mediterranean, now covering almost 90,000 hectares. This area takes in the island of Cabrera Gran and 18 other, smaller islands, including the Illa dels Conills, as well as the surrounding marine areas. It was declared a national park back in 1991, being given the highest nature protection status as a result. Among the species particularly worth protecting here are corals and cetaceans, including dolphins.

Festival atmosphere

In Majorca, a village is never too small for a big festival. The Majorcans simply insist upon it. So it’s not surprising that they organise a festival here in the middle of July to honour the Virgen del Carmen – with processions, cultural performances and plenty of music. The Virgin is the patron saint of fishermen and seafarers – and it’s probably best to keep in her good books when you’re living next to the sea…